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US Tech Lobbyists Find a Second Home in Brussels

As the European Union (EU) considers a new online privacy bill, which would expand consumer’s rights and further limit online profiling, Brussels has become home to hordes of lobbyists.

Form Letters Are Still Relevant When Communicating with Congress

For advocacy organizations, it is critical to understand two misconceptions: first, handwritten letters do not wield more influence on a member than email letters; and second, “form” emails and letters are not necessarily inferior to personalized ones, particularly when message volume is taken into consideration.

Americans Support Lobbying Efforts, Unsure of Lobbyists

The 2014 Public Affairs Pulse survey found an increase in Americans’ acceptance of lobbying interests, though the general attitude toward corporate lobbies remains conflicted.

Facebook Nixes Grassroots Tool

Until recently, organizations could create Facebook apps that allow them to access users’ friends lists: a critical grassroots tool, particularly for peer-to peer influence campaigns.

How AARP Found Its Social Media Voice

AARP gathered as much statistical information as possible about its constituency — and especially about its social media habits. Then, around January 2013, Reeves says, the association convened representatives of every department that plays a role in developing social media content.

Who Tweets on Behalf of Members of Congress?

Perhaps we have the vague sense that a communications director, or even an intern, is the one who hits “post” on behalf of their lawmaker boss.

How IR Became Invested in Public Affairs

Only 8 percent of corporate public affairs teams said their departments have some responsibility for investor relations. But that number is likely to increase as the political and regulatory challenges that companies face become more complex.

‘Personal Lobbying’ for Five Bucks?

Would you pay $4.95 for someone to call a lawmaker on your behalf? Amplify’d, a newly-launched startup, claims to offer “personal lobbyists” for less than five bucks a pop.

How Some K Street Firms Are Doing Business Differently

A handful of Washington’s lobbying firms are undergoing major changes, as reported by The Washington Post’s Catherine Ho.

Are Millennials Making a Right Turn?

In considering the variables, it feels a bit like we Baby Boomers are pulling and tugging at our millennial children once again, arguing over who influences them the most or whether their beliefs are preordained.