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Politics

How to Win in a Polarized Washington

We live in an era where media is extraordinarily fragmented. Agenda shaping happens not only on cable networks but now on social networks. Public opinion is, for better or worse, shaped by thousands of micro conversations.

Wading Into Controversy

Corporations have discovered that customers and employees expect them to get involved in social issues, and that has prompted them to take action.

How Social Media Suppress Public Affairs Discourse

Most social media users are reluctant to share their views on politics and public affairs, particularly when they think their opinions differ from those of their friends.

Form Letters Are Still Relevant When Communicating with Congress

For advocacy organizations, it is critical to understand two misconceptions: first, handwritten letters do not wield more influence on a member than email letters; and second, “form” emails and letters are not necessarily inferior to personalized ones, particularly when message volume is taken into consideration.

Exodus to K Street…in an Election Year?

As election years usually see fewer revolving-door staffers, recruiters believe that a continuous ’brain drain‘ of talent from Congress to K Street involves several factors including severe legislative gridlock.

Who Tweets on Behalf of Members of Congress?

Perhaps we have the vague sense that a communications director, or even an intern, is the one who hits “post” on behalf of their lawmaker boss.

Wikipedia Instates 10-Day Editing Ban on US House of Representatives

A group of anonymous individuals from within the US House of Representatives have posted a series of so-called ‘disruptive’ edits to various Wikipedia pages.

‘Personal Lobbying’ for Five Bucks?

Would you pay $4.95 for someone to call a lawmaker on your behalf? Amplify’d, a newly-launched startup, claims to offer “personal lobbyists” for less than five bucks a pop.

Members of Congress Lack Social Media Know-How

Rather than taking advantage of social media as the two-way channels they represent, many lawmakers are instead using Facebook and Twitter to disseminate press releases and repetitive sound bites.

Broadcast TV Weighs Heavily on Face-to-Face Political Conversations

As advocacy professionals, we spend a lot of time deliberating how to craft and position messages that will resonate with our target audiences. What we tend to think less about, however, is what happens to these messages once they have been received; more specifically, how people converse with one another about the issues they hear and learn about