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Lobbying

’2nd Vote’ App Aims to Inform Consumers’ Purchasing Decisions

Certain organizations are not shy about promoting their political and ideological values. But where do other, less “vocal” organizations fall on the political spectrum?

US Tech Lobbyists Find a Second Home in Brussels

As the European Union (EU) considers a new online privacy bill, which would expand consumer’s rights and further limit online profiling, Brussels has become home to hordes of lobbyists.

Americans Support Lobbying Efforts, Unsure of Lobbyists

The 2014 Public Affairs Pulse survey found an increase in Americans’ acceptance of lobbying interests, though the general attitude toward corporate lobbies remains conflicted.

Exodus to K Street…in an Election Year?

As election years usually see fewer revolving-door staffers, recruiters believe that a continuous ’brain drain‘ of talent from Congress to K Street involves several factors including severe legislative gridlock.

Democrats Face Tough K Street Market

If their bosses are not reelected in November, Democratic Hill staffers hoping to transition to K Street lobbying gigs are up against some tough challenges.

‘Personal Lobbying’ for Five Bucks?

Would you pay $4.95 for someone to call a lawmaker on your behalf? Amplify’d, a newly-launched startup, claims to offer “personal lobbyists” for less than five bucks a pop.

New Legislation Could Prevent Lawmakers from Becoming Lobbyists

Senators Michael Bennet (D-Colo.) and Jon Tester (D-Mont.) have introduced a bill that would prohibit members of Congress from becoming lobbyists after they retire.

How Some K Street Firms Are Doing Business Differently

A handful of Washington’s lobbying firms are undergoing major changes, as reported by The Washington Post’s Catherine Ho.

Is Class Back in Session for K Street?

Two new programs – a George Washington University master’s degree and a Public Affairs Council certificate program – have seasoned lobbyists hitting the books once again.

Fewer Lobbyists Are Heading for the Hill

No one is entirely surprised when a Hill staffer is lured away from the halls of Congress to a plush gig on K Street. But the reverse trend – lobbyists leaving K Street to work as Congressional staffers – also takes place, though it tends to receive much less attention.